ORCHARD FRUITS

PINK LADY APPLE
PINK LADY APPLE

Pink Lady apples are grown under very specific conditions, using a very specific process. The characteristics of a Pink Lady apple are dependent on specific factors like the amount space between the trees in the orchards, the thinning of branches to allow for maximum sunshine, and the numbers of days the apples remain on the trees. Pink Lady apples are left on the trees for 200 days, to capture just the right amount of sunshine.

SUNDOWNER APPLE
SUNDOWNER APPLE

Sundowner is the lesser-known sibling of Pink Lady sometimes referred to as Cripps Red or Cripps II. This apple was developed in 1979 by the Western Australia Department of Agriculture. Sundowner is a warm-climate apple that needs long hot summers to ripen, but it also has a low-chill requirement and will tolerate winters where temperatures are rarely below freezing.

APRICOTS
APRICOTS

Fresh, ripe, well-displayed California apricots are irresistible. And while their peak season is short, consumer demand is growing. An apricot is a fruit or the tree that bears the fruit. Usually, an apricot tree is from the tree species Prunus armeniaca, but the species Prunus brigantina, Prunus mandshurica, Prunus mume, and Prunus sibirica are closely related, have similar fruit, and are also called apricots.

HARCOT APRICOT
HARCOT APRICOT

Outstanding apricot variety from Canada with frost hardy late bloom. Resists brown rot and perennial canker. Medium to large freestone fruit ripens mid June. Sweet, juicy, rich flavor - one of the best.

ASIAN PEAR
ASIAN PEAR

Asian pears are super crunchy - more like crisp apples than other pears. They look more like apples than pears, too. While there are many varieties of Asian pears, the ones most commonly available in the U.S. are a very matte, tan color with a bit more texture and roughness to the skin than other apples or pears.

NECTARINES
NECTARINES

A smooth-skinned peach of the family Rosaceae, known for more than 2,000 years and grown throughout the warmer temperate regions of both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. In tree shape and leaf characteristics the peach and nectarine are indistinguishable, but nectarine fruits look more like plums than peaches because of the smooth skin. The stones and kernels of the two fruits are alike in appearance. Nectarines have red, yellow, or white flesh and are a source of vitamins A and C.

INDIAN BLOOD CLING PEACH
INDIAN BLOOD CLING PEACH

Spaniards introduced this novel peach to Mexico in the 16th century.Later, European explorers in southeastern North America were astonished to find this Old World fruit being grown by native tribes. This was possible because, unlike most fruit varieties that are maintained solely by complex methods of budding or grafting, the 'Indian Blood' can be grown easily from seed. Nomadic tribes and traders must have carried it north from Mexico. Thomas Jefferson ordered this variety in 1807.

PEACHES
PEACHES

The peach is a deciduous tree, native to North-West China, in the region between the Tarim basin and the north slopes of the Kunlun Shan mountains, where it was first domesticated and cultivated. It bears an edible juicy fruit also called a peach. The species name persica refers to its widespread cultivation in Persia, whence it was transplanted to Europe. It belongs to the genus Prunus which includes the cherry and plum, in the family Rosaceae.

SATURN PEACH
SATURN PEACH

Distinctive flat peaches that taste great. Also known as a “doughnut peach,” this uniquely shaped freestone fruit opens up to tender, white flesh with a mild, sweet flavor. Trees bear heavy crops of peaches that measure 2¼-2¾" in diameter. Ripens in late July. Self-pollinating.